The Archdiocese of New York Central Westchester Region invites you to welcome spring with us at our Spring Forward with Learning Mini Conference Day on March 9, 2022 from 1:00pm-4:00pm.

Register before March 4th to reserve your spot!

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

PK-2

ELA: How to Engage Students in Non-Fiction Reading

Students read throughout the day. However, how they interact with text may change based on whether they are reading fiction or non-fiction or participating in a shared reading, guided reading, or independent reading. In this session, participants will dive into the different ways to differentiate texts for students based on how they are connecting with the reading and explore how EPIC can be a great resource in your classroom.

Led by: Kayla Dunn

SCIENCE: Introduction to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Designing NGSS Science Tasks

In this introductory session, teachers will learn about the 3-dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards: (1) Science and Engineering Practices [SEP], (2) Disciplinary Core Ideas [DCI], and (3) Crosscutting Concepts [CCC].

Led by: Jonathan Tam

SEL: SEL in an Early Childhood Classroom 

What does trauma and anxiety look like in an early childhood classroom and how can we use empathy as a tool to promote a safe, nurturing and predictable environment while using reinforcement strategies to promote positive behavior.

Led by: Mary Jo Chevalier and Julieth Benjumea  

MATH: IBL for High-Level Engagement

Oftentimes, students have their best “ah ha” moments when they collaborate with peers. In order to ensure students are making strides in math, meaty academic discourse is a must! During this one hour session, grade level colleagues will watch model inquiry based teaching strategies and consider ways to incorporate these teacher moves into their own instructional space.

Led by: Hannah Painter and Kate Segal

SOCIAL STUDIES: Writing in Social Studies

There are many different types of writing that students are asked to create in Social Studies, but argument writing most closely reflects important ways of thinking that are embedded in historical study. This session will focus on how to actively help students at different grade levels to construct an argument, establish claims, and support them with evidence.

Led by: Lauren Wyner

SEL: SEL in an Early Childhood Classroom 

What does trauma and anxiety look like in an early childhood classroom and how can we use empathy as a tool to promote a safe, nurturing and predictable environment while using reinforcement strategies to promote positive behavior.

Led by: Mary Jo Chevalier and Julieth Benjumea  

SCIENCE: Inquiry Overview

This session is designed to give participants a general overview of inquiry-based instruction. During this workshop, teachers will define what inquiry is, learn how inquiry strategies are a high-yield learning practice for students, and observe what that could look like in your classroom. This is a gentle introduction to the process and rationale behind the instructional model.

Led by: Tiffany Franklin

TECHNOLOGY: Best Ways to Digitize and Blend Your Classroom

If you are still using paper worksheets in your class, then you need to attend this workshop! This workshop will give you the best ways you can continue to use that same worksheet and begin to digitize the grading process. This also will include strategies for creating a “blended class”. Blended Learning is a mix of small-group instruction and the use of targeted digital tools. This classroom leads to more engaged and independent students.

Led by: John Matula

SEL: SEL in an Early Childhood Classroom 

What does trauma and anxiety look like in an early childhood classroom and how can we use empathy as a tool to promote a safe, nurturing and predictable environment while using reinforcement strategies to promote positive behavior.

Led by: Mary Jo Chevalier and Julieth Benjumea  

Grades 3-5

MATH: IBL for High-Level Engagement

Oftentimes, students have their best “ah ha” moments when they collaborate with peers. In order to ensure students are making strides in math, meaty academic discourse is a must! During this one hour session, grade level colleagues will watch model inquiry based teaching strategies and consider ways to incorporate these teacher moves into their own instructional space.

Led by: Hannah Painter and Kate Segal

SOCIAL STUDIES: Writing in Social Studies

There are many different types of writing that students are asked to create in Social Studies, but argument writing most closely reflects important ways of thinking that are embedded in historical study. This session will focus on how to actively help students at different grade levels to construct an argument, establish claims, and support them with evidence.

Led by: Lauren Wyner

SCIENCE: IBL – Asking Questions & Inquiry Based Learning in Science

Using phenomena as a springboard for student questioning – In this session we’ll explore the Science and Engineering Practice of Asking Questions. Using phenomena as our anchor, we’ll explore what this practice requires of students and use a Driving Question Board as one strategy to employ in bringing student questions- and voice and choice- into the learning environment.

Led by: Tiffany Franklin

TECHNOLOGY: Best Ways to Digitize and Blend Your Classroom

If you are still using paper worksheets in your class, then you need to attend this workshop! This workshop will give you the best ways you can continue to use that same worksheet and begin to digitize the grading process. This also will include strategies for creating a “blended class”. Blended Learning is a mix of small-group instruction and the use of targeted digital tools. This classroom leads to more engaged and independent students.

Led by: John Matula

ELA: How to Elicit Higher Order Answers

Every question a teacher asks is designed to elicit a response from a student. However, we do not always receive the response we expect. The process by which students respond should not be left up to chance. In this session, participants will dive deep into strategies to elicit higher order responses and use individual work time to develop a plan to implement a few strategies into their classroom.

Led by: Kayla Dunn

SCIENCE: Describing, Applying, and Designing Solutions: Constructing Explanations in Science Courses

Constructing explanations is a skill in science that uses evidence and data to support claims and create solutions to real-world problems. Revealed in the NWEA MAP data is the multitude of ways students will need to do this from applying ideas from a passage to describing their understanding comprehensively.

Led by: Jonathan Tam

Grades 6-8

SCIENCE: IBL – Asking Questions & Inquiry Based Learning in Science

Using phenomena as a springboard for student questioning – In this session we’ll explore the Science and Engineering Practice of Asking Questions. Using phenomena as our anchor, we’ll explore what this practice requires of students and use a Driving Question Board as one strategy to employ in bringing student questions- and voice and choice- into the learning environment.

Led by: Tiffany Franklin

TECHNOLOGY: Best Ways to Digitize and Blend Your Classroom

If you are still using paper worksheets in your class, then you need to attend this workshop! This workshop will give you the best ways you can continue to use that same worksheet and begin to digitize the grading process. This also will include strategies for creating a “blended class”. Blended Learning is a mix of small-group instruction and the use of targeted digital tools. This classroom leads to more engaged and independent students.

Led by: John Matula

ELA: Using Student Exemplars to Teach Writing

One of the strongest ways for students to show comprehension of a standard is through writing. However, students may struggle with the writing process and understanding expectations. In this session, participants will dive deep into using student exemplars to create a criteria of success and then allowing students to peer evaluate work to understand how to revise their own work.

Led by: Kayla Dunn

SCIENCE: Describing, Applying, and Designing Solutions: Constructing Explanations in Science Courses

Constructing explanations is a skill in science that uses evidence and data to support claims and create solutions to real-world problems. Revealed in the NWEA MAP data is the multitude of ways students will need to do this from applying ideas from a passage to describing their understanding comprehensively.

Led by: Jonathan Tam

MATH: IBL for High-Level Engagement 

Oftentimes, students have their best “ah ha” moments when they collaborate with peers. In order to ensure students are making strides in math, meaty academic discourse is a must! During this one hour session, grade level colleagues will watch model inquiry based teaching strategies and consider ways to incorporate these teacher moves into their own instructional space.

Led by: Hannah Painter and Kate Segal

SOCIAL STUDIES: Writing in Social Studies

There are many different types of writing that students are asked to create in Social Studies, but argument writing most closely reflects important ways of thinking that are embedded in historical study. This session will focus on how to actively help students at different grade levels to construct an argument, establish claims, and support them with evidence.

Led by: Lauren Wyner

Register Here